Friday photo – inspired by faith

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I saw this poster on Sunday at Woodbrooke. I like the beginning and the ending – I could think of lots of ways to respond to the idea of inspired by faith but this answer is one that came to me in my teenage years through engaging with church. What are you inspired by faith to do or be or think or create or….

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Honest Christianity – I do believe but I don’t practise

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I was listening to the radio this morning and a woman responded to a question about if she had any person faith saying ”I do believe but I don’t practise it”. What an interesting turn of phrase and self understanding. She was then asked when she last prayed and she said “about two weeks ago”.

What a fascinating definition of “not a practising Christian”. She prays to God who she believes in! I would love to know what she thinks a practising Christian does and believes? What do we believe? Something around personal relationship? Well she prays. Believe God loves us and Jesus died for us to have a relationship? She believes that God exists and is
interested enough in her to hear her prayers and potentially answer them. Trust in God with the whole of our lives? Well she is looking to God for some of her life.

I wonder how we engage with her? I would ask the question I mentioned earlier, what she thinks a practising Christian does and believes? Well I hope we would encourage her in what she does have and does. I would assure her of God’s love and desire to relate with her from where she is . Perhaps a way to engage with the many folks who are in this or similar position, affirmation not condemnation.

Wondering Wednesdays – remembering Dibs

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I read Dibs in search of self by Virginia Axline when I was an undergraduate many years ago. It is one of those books which shaped and changed my thinking on work with children and young people. There is a quote which I return to often from it:
Perhaps there is more understanding and beauty in life when the glaring sunshine is softened by the patterns of the shadows. Perhaps there is more depth in a relationship that has weathered some storms. Experience that never disappoints or saddens or stirs up feelings is a bland experience with little challenge or variation in colour. Perhaps when we experience confidence and hope that we see materialize before our eyes this builds up within us a feeling of inner strength, courage and security.

Honest Christianity – Paradox: growing secularization and prominence of religion in public discussion – Grace Davie

Grace Davie

Sally and I were at chaplaincy research conference this week. The keynote speakers was Grace Davie, professor emeritus at Exeter University. She is the writer and researcher who coined the phrase believing without belonging as a description of what had begun to happen with Christianity when she first published Religion in Britain in 1994.

She used the title phrase of the blog to describe our current situation in the UK. We have often reflected in our blogs on the connections between culture and religion. If this observation resonates with you as it does with us as a truism, then what are the implications for Christianity, ministry and our country? Might we find friends and people of peace in unusual places? What might the nature of mission look and feel like? Who will share our values of accountability to a higher power and authority?

The other point Grace made was just as the observations have changed since she wrote 20 years ago, what will change in and characterize the next 10-20 years? She talked about perspectives on non-human animals and artificial intelligence as potential areas… What do you think?

Friday photo – closed doors

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I walked past this door today, I am not sure where it goes. Possibly into a church but the church is at a different level. It sort of looked like an ecclesiastical door to me! I have walked past it many times but today is the first time I had really noticed it. Perhaps this is because at the moment I am waiting for a couple of doors to be opened.

Closed doors can be immensely frustrating, particularly when they seem to be locked from the inside. They can also be very exciting wondering what is beyond them and speculating as to whether the risk is worth it to walk through, not knowing what may be on the other side. The doors I am looking to open are in many ways quite prosaic, they are not life changing doors but that has not always been the case. (This is not one of those posts with a hidden meaning or anyting). Waiting for a door to open can be one of those times for lots of faith and prayer and as time goes on without it opening lots of questions too!

Honest Christianity – binds or blinds – positive and negative effects of religion

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‘Binds or blinds’ was a phrase used by Rabbi Jonathan Sacks on television today when discussing his new book ‘Not in God’s name. What an eloquent description of honest Christianity. There are so many expressions where Christianity is and has been a positive blessing to our communities and societies. Sadly, there are also times where in the name of our God and Christianity, we have been a negative influence – being our own worst enemy,
thinking, treating and speaking of others in a way that blinds ourselves and others.

Honest Christianity acknowledges both of these and makes a commitment to be an influence for blessing and a bind of and to all things good. To express grace, love, generosity, to seek to bring credit and bind each other to the benefits of our faith and God.

Honest Christianity – locked doors

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Some people we are close to are going through very difficult times at the moment – this image is one which fills us with hope – and gives us something that we can pray. Sometimes a book is worth reading for one thought we find in it, this is one of those times.
The image of Christ going through locked doors is perhaps the most consoling within our entire faith. Put simply, it means that God can help us even when we cannot help ourselves. God can empower us even when we are too weak and despairing, even minimally, to open the door to let him in.

Reference Ronald Rolheiser Forgotten Among the Lilies New York Image Doubleday p148